Old school cartomancy


DIAMONDS.

  • King. A man of very fair complexion; quick to auger, but soon appeased.
  • Queen. A very fair woman, fond of gaiety, and a coquette.
  • Knave. A selfish and deceitful relative: fair and false.
  • Ten. Money. Success in honourable business. Nine. A roving disposition, combined with honour able and successful adventure in foreign lands.
  • Eight. A happy prudent marriage, though rather late in life.
  • Seven. Satire. Scandal. Unpleasant business matters.
  • Six. Marriage early in life, succeeded by widow-hood.
  • Five. Unexpected news, generally of a good kind. 
  • Four. An unfaithful friend. A secret betrayed. 
  • Trey. Domestic troubles, quarrels and unhappiness. 
  • Deuce. A clandestine engagement. A card of caution. 
  • Ace. A wedding ring. An offer of marriage.

HEARTS.

  • King. A fair, but not very fair, complexioned man: good natured, but rather obstinate, and, when angered, not easily appeased.
  • Queen. A woman of the same complexion as the king; faithful, prudent, and affectionate.
  • Knave. An unselfish relative. A sincere friend. Ten. Health and happiness, with many children. Nine. Wealth. High position in society. The wish-card.
  • Eight. Fine clothes. Pleasure. Mixing in good society. Going to balls, theatres, &e.
  • Seven. Many good friends.
  • Six. Honourable courtship.
  • Five. A present.
  • Four. Domestic troubles caused by jealousy.
  • Trey. Poverty, shame and sorrow, caused by imprudence. A card of caution.
  • Deuce. Success in life, position in society, and a happy marriage, attained by virtuous discretion.
  • Ace. The house of the person consulting the decrees of fate.

SPADES.

  • King. A man of very dark complexion, ambitious and unscrupulous.
  • Queen. A very dark complexioned woman, of malicious disposition. A widow.
  • Knave. A lawyer. A person to be shunned.
  • Ten.. Disgrace: crime: imprisonment. Death on the scaffold. A card of caution.
  • Nine. Grief: ruin: sickness: death.
  • Eight. Great danger from imprudence. A card of caution.
  • Seven. Unexpected poverty caused by the death of a relative. A lean sorrow.
  • Six. A child. To the unmarried a card of caution.
  • Five. Great danger from giving way to bad temper. A card of caution.
  • Four. Sickness.
  • Trey. A journey by land. Tears.
  • Deuce. A removal.
  • Ace. Death; malice; a duel; a general misfortune.

CLUBS.

  • King. A dark complexioned man, though not so dark as the king of spades: upright, true, and affectionate.
  • Queen. A woman of the same complexion, agreeable, genteel, and witty.
  • Knave. A sincere, but rather hasty-tempered friend. Ten. Unexpected wealth, through the death of a relative. A fat sorrow.
  • Nine. Danger caused by drunkenness. A card of caution.
  • Eight. Danger from covetousness. A card of caution. Seven. A prison. Danger arising from the opposite sex. A card of caution.
  • Six. Competence by hard-working industry. Five. A happy, though not wealthy marriage. Four. Danger of misfortunes caused by inconstancy, or capricious temper. A card of caution. Trey. Quarrels. Or in reference to time may signify three years, three mouths, three weeks, or three days. it also denotes that a person will be married more than once.
  • Deuce. Vexation, disappointment.
  • Ace. A letter.

Source: Chambers book of days

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